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Knee Pain Seminar

MMC Rice Lake Event

When: June 24, 2019
6:00-7:30 pm

Where: Holiday Inn Express
824 Bear Paw Ave
Rice Lake, WI 54868

Dr. Joseph Signorelli
Orthopedic Surgeon

Dr. Joseph Signorelli is a board certified orthopedic surgeon with Orthopedic Services of Memorial Medical Center in Ashland. Dr. Signorelli formerly served as medical director of the Joint Replacement Center at Essentia Health – Orthopaedics in Duluth. Dr. Signorelli currently completes approximately 400 joint replacement surgeries a year, focusing primarily on the hip followed by the knee.

Dr. Signorelli completed a year long Arthroplasty Fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Brigham and Women’s Hospital is a teaching affiliate to Harvard Medical School. He is a graduate of the Orthopedic Surgery Residency program at Dartmouth and attended medical school at the University of Minnesota.

Dr. Signorelli was born and raised in Duluth. He is married to his 9th grade sweetheart and has a 10-year old son. When he’s not working, you will find him fishing, camping, canoeing or brewing beer. He and his family recently purchased a home outside of Washburn and he is looking forward to improving his fishing record on Chequamegon Bay.

Dr. Justin Cummins
Orthopedic Surgeon

Dr. Justin Cummins is a board certified orthopedic surgeon. Dr. Cummins formerly served as an orthopedic surgeon at Essentia Health – Duluth Clinic. Dr. Cummins focuses primarily on sports medicine, including arthroscopic shoulder, knee, and hip surgeries. During his tenure, Dr. Cummins has successfully performed over 5,000 surgeries. This includes treating Olympians, Division I, II and III college athletes, prep athletes and others.

Dr. Cummins completed a year long Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Fellowship at the Aspen Foundation for Sports Medicine in Aspen, Colorado. He completed his residency at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center and attended medical school at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Cummins also has a Masters degree in Evaluative Clinical Science from Dartmouth College.

Dr. Cummins grew up in a small town in Idaho and is looking forward to returning to his rural roots. He and his wife have four children and recently took up completing triathlons together. When they aren’t busy training, you will find them enjoying a number of water sports near their home in Lake Nebagamon or checking out area hiking and biking trails.

About The NAVIO Surgical System


HOW TRADITIONAL TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT METHODS WORK

Using traditional surgical methods, cutting blocks or guides are placed on the thigh bone (femur) and shin bone (tibia) to help direct a surgical saw in removing the diseased bone and cartilage. This method has been considered technically challenging, as accurately placing these blocks can be difficult. In recent years, advanced surgical techniques using robotic assistance have been developed to provide a higher level of accuracy and precision.

NAVIO ROBOTIC ASSISTANCE PROVIDES ACCURACY AND PRECISION

The NAVIO system is an advancement in the way our orthopedic surgeons perform knee replacement. The system works in conjunction with our surgeon’s skilled hands to achieve the precise positioning of the knee implant based on each patient’s unique anatomy.

This added level of accuracy can help improve the function, feel and potential longevity of the knee implant. Through an advanced computer program, the NAVIO system provides robotic assistance that relays precise information about your knee to a robotics-assisted handpiece used by our surgeons during the procedure. By collecting patient-specific data, boundaries are established for the handpiece so we can remove the damaged surfaces of your knee, balance your joint, and position the implant with greater precision.

ADVANCED INSTRUMENTATION

Designed to enforce bone resurfacing within surgeon defined plan

COMPUTER ASSISTANCE

Designed to ensure consistent and accurate results

ROBOTICS-ASSISTED HANDPIECE

Designed to enable access through smaller incisions